Marsh Award Shortlisted

Gordon Young

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A visual artist who focuses on creating art for the public domain, Gordon was born in Carlisle and grew up in Cumbria. From an early age he was fascinated by the way that people have shaped the environment. He studied at Carlisle College of Art then in Coventry and at the Royal College of Art. He was curator of the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Welsh Sculpture Trust before becoming a full-time artist. His work relates directly to its surroundings and how people use places. Gordon’s diverse projects range from sculptures, a Cursing Stone to typographic pavements, the acclaimed Comedy Carpet being an example which won the 2012 Marsh Award for Excellence in Public Sculpture. He has won a numbers of awards with his work which often include collaborations and text. He also remains a supporter of Leeds United.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: MK ROSE

MK Rose , April 2014, black and white granite, with small amounts of stainless steel,and water features, approximate diameter 42m. and area 1200m2 ,Campbell Park,Milton Keynes, photo: courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

MK Rose, April 2014, black and white granite, with small amounts of stainless steel,and water features, approximate diameter 42m. and area 1200m2 ,Campbell Park,Milton Keynes, photo: courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Richard Wilson

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Born in Islington, London, Richard studied at the London College of Printing, Hornsey College of Art and Reading University. He is renowned for his interventions in architectural space which draw inspiration from engineering and construction. He has exhibited internationally for over 30 years and has represented Britain in the Sydney, São Paulo and Venice Biennials and the Yokohama Triennial. Nominated twice for the Turner Prize, Richard was awarded the prestigious DAAD residency in Berlin 1992-93. Richard’s installations have been widely acclaimed. His seminal installation 20:50, a sea of reflective oil sump, in the Saatchi Collection was described by art critic Andrew Graham Dixon as ‘one of the masterpieces of the modern age.’ In 2008, his contribution to Liverpool’s European Capital of Culture, Turning the Place Over, comprised a vast ovoid section of a façade that rotated three dimensionally on a spindle. While his regional cultural Olympic exhibition at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill in 2012 Hang on a Minute Lads I’ve got a Great Idearecreating a scene from the film, The Italian Job, had a hydraulically teetering replica coach positioned at the edge of the building’s roof. In 2004 he was appointed Visiting Research Professor at the University of East London and in 2008 was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Middlesex. He is also Honorary Professor of Sculpture at the Royal Academy Schools. Richard is also a musician and co-formed the Bow Gamelan Ensemble (1983-1992).

Marsh Award shortlisted work: SLIPSTREAM

Slipstream , April 2014, plywood and aluminium, length 78m., weight 77 tonnes, Heathrow Terminal 2, Hounslow, photo courtesy David Levene

Slipstream, April 2014, plywood and aluminium, length 78m.,
weight 77 tonnes, Heathrow Terminal 2, Hounslow, photo
courtesy David Levene

Studio Weave

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A London-based architecture practice set up in 2006, Studio Weave balances a joyful, open-minded approach with technical precision to create a diverse body of work for public, private and commercial clients internationally. From the characteristics that make somewhere unique, to the particular skills of a master craftsperson; Studio Weave aims to harness the strengths of a project and its team to create something distinctive and of exceptional quality. It has received three RIBA awards, with Ecology of Colour winning South East Building of the Year 2013, also the Architectural Review’s International Emerging Architecture Award and the Civic Trust Award with The Longest Bench winning the Special Award for Community Impact and Engagement.

Founding Directors :

Je Ahn was born in South Korea and moved to the UK when he was thirteen. He is a RIBAChartered Architect and studied Architecture at the University of Bath, TU Delft in The Netherlands and London Metropolitan University. Prior to setting up Studio Weave, Je worked on a range of projects including renovating historic houses in West London, the City of London’s largest office development and Crossrail. Je is a visiting critic at universities in the UK and abroad and is a member of the Southwark Design Review Panel.

Maria Smith grew up in Sussex. She is an ARB registered Architect and studied Architecture at the University of Bath, TU Delft in The Netherlands and London Metropolitan. Before founding Studio Weave, Maria worked on various projects including libraries, secondary schools, and housing. In 2013 Maria was Highly Commended in the Architect’s Journal’s Emerging Woman Architect of the Year Awards. Maria also writes a monthly column for the RIBA Journal on practice.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: THE LULLABY FACTORY

The Lullaby Factory , October 2012, mixture of spun and fabricated aluminium, some elements coloured gold and copper with specially mixed tinted lacquers, complex elements moulded from GRP (glass reinforced plastic) finished with a brushed and lacquered thermal arc metal finish, also old taps and gauges reclaimed from a decommissioned boiler house at the hospital, covers an area that is approximately 42m. in length and 30m. high, Great Ormond Street Hospital, Great Ormond Street, London WC1, photo courtesy of Studio Weave

The Lullaby Factory, October 2012, mixture of spun and fabricated aluminium, some elements coloured gold and copper with specially mixed tinted lacquers, complex elements moulded from GRP (glass reinforced plastic) finished with a brushed and lacquered thermal arc metal finish, also old taps and gauges reclaimed from a decommissioned boiler house at the hospital, covers an area that is approximately 42m. in length and 30m. high, Great Ormond Street Hospital, Great Ormond Street, London WC1, photo courtesy of Studio Weave

Anthony Smith MA, ARBS,FLS

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Anthony has two great passions; natural history and art, which he combines through his sculpture. He grew up in the Middle East, where he became interested in wildlife. Fascination with animal evolution led him to study zoology at Christ’s College, Cambridge and at the same time he taught himself traditional sculpting techniques and the process of bronze casting. He began exhibiting his wildlife sculptures in London at the age of eighteen and also developed an interest in portraiture. After graduating in 2005, Anthony set up a sculpture studio in Cambridge. In 2009 the University of Cambridge commissioned him to create a life-size bronze statue of Charles Darwin as a young man, which was short-listed for the Marsh Award for Excellence in Public Sculpture. Anthony has recently returned from the sub-Antarctic, where he was South Georgia Trust Artist in Residence working on a new series of wildlife sculptures. We all handle Anthony’s sculptures on a regular basis, because he is also a medalist and his Guinea £2 coin commissioned by the Royal Mint is currently in circulation.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: ALFRED RUSSEL WALLACE

Alfred Russel Wallace , 2013, bronze h. 213.4cm Natural History Museum, London photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Alfred Russel Wallace, 2013, bronze h. 213.4cm Natural History Museum, London photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Yinka Shonibare MBE, RA

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A British-Nigerian artist living in London, Yinka Shonibare’s practice includes painting, sculpture, photography, collage and film. Colourful Dutch wax batik fabrics common in Western Africa are used throughout his work. His work explores issues of cultural and national identity and colonialism. He has referred to himself as a ‘post-colonial’ hybrid. Shonibare studied at Central Saint Martins College of Art and at Goldsmith’s College (MFA) and then worked as an Arts Development Officer for Shape Arts; a charity which he still supports. His international artistic career was launched in 2002 by the sculpture, Gallantry and Criminal Conversation, a commission from Okwui Enwezor at Documenta 10 and he was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2004. His first public art commission was his celebrated Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle, the first artwork exhibited on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square in 2010. Shonibare has exhibited at the Venice Biennale and his work features in many international museums. In 2008 he held a major mid-career survey at the MCA in Sydney which went on to tour Brooklyn Museum, New York and the Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian in Washington.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: WIND SCULPTURE

Wind Sculpture , 2014, steel armature with hand-painted fibreglass resin cast 6m. X 3m., junction of Wilcox Place and Howick Place, London SW1, photo courtesy the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Wind Sculpture, 2014, steel armature with hand-painted fibreglass resin cast 6m. X 3m., junction of Wilcox Place and Howick Place, London SW1, photo courtesy the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Andy Scott ARBS

Born in Springburn, north of Glasgow, Andy attended Glasgow School of Art and is now based in Maryhill. He works in galvanised steel, fibreglass and cast bronze and specialises in corporate and civic public art. He has completed more than 70 public commissions internationally. Much of his work is associated with urban regeneration, particularly in Scotland. He has created many works for his native city, with which he feels a strong bond. These include The Ibrox Disaster Memorial (2001) and the HeavyHorse (1997), a Clydesdale, the breed of heavy working horses once used in Glasgow, but ‘now just a show horse’, rather like the city itself, Andy has observed. Animals are a recurring theme in his work, such as Gypsy Cob (2011) for the Borough of Bexley, East London – his first public art work for the Capital, the Stag (2012) at Lomondgate Business Park and The Kelpies (2013) at Falkirk, which received the National UK Structural Steel Design Award for 2014. This year Andy was awarded an Honorary Fellowship by the Royal Incorporation of Architects for his contribution to sculptural landmarks across Scotland and beyond and in appreciation of his emphasis on education and community consultation in creating works. He also received an Honorary Doctorate from Strathclyde University for raising awareness and perception of structural and environmental engineering through his work. He is currently working on an even larger work than The Kelpies, a Friesan Horse for Friesland in the Netherlands.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: THE KELPIES

The Kelpies , 2013, stainless steel skin panels, h.30m., ‘the Helix’ Park, Falkirk, Scotland, photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

The Kelpies, 2013, stainless steel skin panels, h.30m., ‘the Helix’
Park, Falkirk, Scotland, photo courtesy of the Public Monuments
and Sculpture Association

Robert Rattray GCGI

Robert Rattray was born in Ireland and grew up in the Welsh countryside. His rural upbringing moulded his love of the outdoors, animals, and landscapes, which he seeks to translate into both paintings and sculptures. He studied portraiture at the City and Guilds of London Art School, graduating in 1995, but his main passion is sculpting animals which he has been pursuing as a profession since 1994. He now has his studio in South Wales looking over the Brecon Beacons, which are a continuing source of inspiration to him. Robert specialises in portraiture and animal pieces and works both as a sculptor in silver, bronze and steel and as a watercolourist. His bronze and silver pieces are modelled in an impressionistic style and encapsulate the tension and immediacy of the animal’s pose – a single moment captured in a snapshot – the graceful power of a cheetah’s stride or the intense battle between rutting stags. In 2011 Robert was ‘Highly Commended’ at the Wildlife Artist of the Year Award for his bronze life-size Otter and Sea Trout. He exhibits his work internationally and has private clients in the UK, USA and Australia. Robert’s garden sculptures are particularly sought-after. Garden sculpture he has created includes the Archer in the Demi Lune and the heraldic style Porcupine in the Flag Garden at the fortified manor house of Penshurst Place in Kent. Robert works both from London and his studio in Wales.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: THE WINDSOR GREYS

The Windsor Greys , 2014, bronze, life-size, the roundabout at Albert and Kings Road Junction, Windsor, Berkshire,photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

The Windsor Greys, 2014, bronze, life-size, the roundabout at
Albert and Kings Road Junction, Windsor, Berkshire,photo courtesy
of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Sir Anish Kapoor RA

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: THE ARCELORMITTAL ORBIT

Designed by Sir Anish Kapoor, engineered by Cecil Balmond,  The ArcelorMittal Orbit , 2012, recycled steel, h. 114.5cm., Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Stratford, photo: courtesy of  The Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Designed by Sir Anish Kapoor, engineered by Cecil Balmond,
The ArcelorMittal Orbit, 2012, recycled steel, h. 114.5cm.,
Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Stratford, photo: courtesy of
The Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Michael Johnson

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From 1976 until 1991, Michael Johnson worked in London and Nottingham, moving to Poplars Farm in Nottinghamshire and setting up a studio complex where he now lives and works. In 1991 he gave up lecturing to concentrate on studio work and making artworks for public spaces. His first commission for the Duchy of Cornwall was a pair of 25’ high sculptural gates for the Jewellery Business Centre in Birmingham which won the Birmingham Design Award. Mike has now completed over 160 commissions for both rural and urban sites throughout the UK. His clients range from national institutions, banks and property developers to local authorities, landscape artists, community groups and schools. His signature materials are stainless steel and bronze, but many of his works include glass, stone and found objects. The works have a distinct reference to a site’s community, history and heritage. Apple (2011) at Chesterfield, for example, depicts the town’s origins, development and industries as well as its people. Another aspect of Mike’s work is the production of inlays, which are distinctive works using stainless steel and bronze with the inclusion of stained glass and mosaic, such as those at Caerphilly Castle, Chester Millennium Trail and the North Wales Coastal Footpath. Over 120 of these works have been installed in the UK.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: DANUM

Danum , 2012, stainless steel, bronze h. 8m., Sir Nigel Gresley Square, Doncaster photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Danum, 2012, stainless steel, bronze h. 8m., Sir Nigel Gresley Square, Doncaster photo courtesy of the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association

Martin Jennings FRBS

Martin Jennings has a studio in the countryside just outside Oxford. He read English Literature at Oxford University before training as a calligrapher and letter-cutter at the City and Guilds of London Art School in 1980. He then served a part-time apprenticeship to Richard Kindersley in Kennington. After working briefly in Carrara, Italy, Martin turned to figurative work and took a course at the Sir John Cass School of Art in Whitechapel. He now concentrates on portrait sculpture and public statues, often incorporating inscriptions. He has received commissions from many national institutions including the National Portrait Gallery, St. Paul’s Cathedral and the University of Oxford. His subjects are taken from the world of politics, the military, royalty, academia, industry, medicine, law and literature. His statues of John Betjeman (2007) at St. Pancras Station in London and Philip Larkin (2010) at Hull Paragon Station are celebrated landmarks. Martin’s current commissions include a monument to the Crimean war heroine, Mary Seacole for London’s South Bank, a statue of George Orwell for Broadcasting House and a sculpture of the Women of Steel for Sheffield city centre. His monument to pioneering plastic surgeon, Sir Archibald McIndoe, who treated his war hero father, was recently unveiled at East Grinstead. Pangolin Editions cast all Martin’s silver and bronze work.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: CHARLES DICKENS

Charles Dickens , 2014, bronze h.1.5m. , Portland stone base h. 20cm., Guildhall Square, Portsmouth, photo: courtesy of Martin Jennings

Charles Dickens, 2014, bronze h.1.5m. , Portland stone base h. 20cm., Guildhall Square, Portsmouth, photo: courtesy of Martin Jennings

Catherine Bertola, Gudrun Haraldsdottir & Fiona Heron

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Catherine Bertola studied at Newcastle University and currently lives and works in Gateshead. She creates installations, objects and drawings that respond to particular sites, collections and historic contexts. Underpinning the work is a desire to look beyond the surface of objects and buildings, to uncover forgotten and invisible histories of places and people, as a way of reframing and considering the past. Catherine’s solo exhibitions include; Brontë Parsonage Museum, Haworth, Firstsite, Colchester, Nottingham Castle, Nottingham, and Fabrica, Brighton. She has also participated in several group exhibitions nationally and internationally with institutions such as the Museum of Arts and Design in New York, Kunsthalle zu Kiel, Germany and the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester. Catherine has also worked on a number of temporary and permanent commissions, including those for the V&A, London, the National Museum Wales, Cardiff, the Government Art Collection, The National Trust and National Trust for Scotland. She has worked in several public and private collections and is represented by Workplace Gallery, Gateshead and M+R Fricke, Berlin.

Marsh Award Shortlisted work: NORTH GATE BUS STATION, Northampton

Catherine Bertola,  Base mapping , 2014, vinyl on glass, North Gate Bus Station, Northampton, photo:James Smith, Images courtesy the artist, Workplace Gallery and Galerie M+R Fricke.

Catherine Bertola, Base mapping, 2014, vinyl on glass, North
Gate Bus Station, Northampton, photo:James Smith,
Images courtesy the artist, Workplace Gallery and
Galerie M+R Fricke.

Aurora Corio